Friday, 18 April 2014

JOHN BYRNE'S FANTASTIC FOUR COVER GALLERY - PART FIVE...


Images copyright MARVEL COMICS

In answer to 100s of requests (I was up all night typing them),
here's the 5th batch of Jumpin' JOHNNY BYRNE covers from
his '80s run on The FANTASTIC FOUR.  Fans of the series who
no longer own the original issues could do worse than spend their
hard-earned shekels on the two-set MARVEL OMNIBUS vol-
umes containing all of JB's Fabulous Foursome adventures.

For any of you who may be interested in purchasing
them, here's the necessary information:

Volume one - ISBN # 978-0-7851-5824-0

Volume two - ISBN # 978-0-7851-8543-7

Both editions contain loads of great extras and should prove
welcome additions to any true Marvelite's bookshelves.  Why
not check out your local FORBIDDEN PLANET store for
them at the earliest opportunity?!









6 comments:

Colin Jones said...

This is the first time I've ever seen these covers as I wasn't buying any comics at this time, that black & white one looks weird. The next time I'm in Forbidden Planet I shall definitely have a look for those two volumes but when that will be I don't know - I haven't visited FP since November 2012. One thing I've wondered about with comics from those days is the box in the bottom left hand corner with the Spidey face - did the face replace the bar code because UK shops didn't have bar code scanners in those days? I always liked the bar code on pictures I've seen of U.S. comics as it made the comics look more "grown-up" and professional I thought while the Spidey face replacement looked rather childish. Modern comics have the bar code loud and proud.

Kid said...

I have to say that I'm not a fan of the bar code, CJ. Superhero comics were allowed to look less grown-up 30 years ago because they were still mainly aimed at teenagers. I, for one, am not concerned whether anyone thinks reading comics is 'childish', because I don't seek anyone's approval for my tastes or interests. In fact, you could say it's been the pointless pursuit of presenting comics in a more 'grown up' light that has led to their decline, but that's another matter.

Bar code scanners were in use in Britain in 1979, but weren't widespread. The bar code was printed on comics intended for sale in newsagents and supermarkets, but were replaced by Spidey's head (or the DC bullet) for direct edition comics sold mainly in comicbook shops.

Colin Jones said...

Kid, all the American comics I bought from about 1979 to 1983 were bought in WH Smith's but they all had that Spidey face not the bar code. I didn't mean to imply that comics were childish, just that I liked the look that the bar code gave to a comic but that's just a personal view obviously. You mentioned the term "direct edition" and I see that a lot with regards to modern comics but I never knew what it meant - so it just means comics for sale in specialist comics shops does it? I do miss being able to buy American comics in newsagents as well as comics shops though.

Kid said...

I was talking mainly about the system in America, CJ, but if WHS were selling comics with the Spidey head, they must have been selling the direct editions. Perhaps that's what they were provided with because the bar code would have the American price on it. I seem to remember 'though, that some of the comics I bought had the bar code, some had the Spidey head, so in Britain it seems to have been a bit of a mix. However, the reason for the difference, as far as America goes, was as I explained.

Colin Jones said...

Kid, just a final couple of questions - 1) who is that meant to be on the cover of #275, is it Stan Lee or is it John Byrne (I don't know what Byrne looks like) and 2) do you keep your comics protected in plastic bags or are they just piled up in a cupboard? They look in excellent condition anyway.

Kid said...

Looks-wise, I suspect it's based on Stan Lee, but it's a 'girlie' pin-up mag publisher in the story. I have a few collectors' item #1s in plastic bags with cardboard backing, but most of my comics are carefully stored in cupboards, drawers, comic boxes and filing cabinets. Most of my comics are in the same condition as when I bought them, whatever condition that happened to be. Some are better than when I got them, because I've ironed out wrinkles and fixed any slight imperfections.

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