Saturday, 20 May 2017

RICH BUCKLER PASSES AWAY (UPDATED)...



It's been reported that comicbook artist RICH
BUCKLER has passed away.  He was an artist that
could imitate the styles of others, but he was pretty
good in his own right too, especially as a painter.
Another great artist gone, alas, aged only 68.




20 comments:

baab said...

Plenty of books in my memory and some in my collection.
Deathlok was probably my first contact then I noticed his work all over the place in the seventies.
Atlas comics as well,I just bought a copy of Demon Hunter,an important book for me.
Ah well, he shone while he was here and we watched him.

Kid said...

Deathlok was probably where I first saw his work too, Baab. Yes, he did indeed shine.

Paul McScotty Muir said...

Oh that is sad new - 68 is far too young - Rich Buckler was one of those artists that I always really liked but didn't actively collect despite having loads of his comics in my collections. My first memory of Rich's work was Avengers issue 106 in 1972 -a comic that brings back a particular memory for me and one I am still looking for as a replacement to am long lost original - and of course Dealthlok, still one of my all time favourite comics. Like baab, Demon Hunter was another book I loved of his - he was a big part of my 70s as a teen and always brought a smile to my face when I saw his name on a comic I just purchased - as always the main loss is to his family and friends at this awful time for them.

Kid said...

Sad news indeed, PM, and cut down by the very thing that you've experienced in your family - cancer. I'm not 100% certain if I first saw his work on Deathlok or the Fantastic Four back in the '70s, but, in memory, I mostly associate him with the former in that particular period.

Paul McScotty Muir said...

Fuffin "Cancer" again, the real Thanos and Darkseid of our world. I never realised that Rich must has been so young when he drew Avengers only 23 or so and he must have been doing major strips before that.

Kid said...

I think (could be wrong) his first professional work appeared in the late '60s, PM.

TC said...

Wikipedia lists his first professionally published work as "Freedom Fighters: Washington Attacks Trenton," a back-up feature in King Comics' Flash Gordon #10 in 1967 in late 1967 (when Buckler would have been 17 or 18). I had that issue, although at the time I would not have known one artist from another, in most cases. (IIRC, the lead feature in that issue was "The Tournament of Mongo," reprinting the 1930's comic strip.)

From the title, I would assume that it was intended as the first in series about the Revolutionary War, although, AFAIK, there were no other episodes.

I mostly associate Rich Buckler with All-Star Squadron and 1970's-early 1980's DC.

Kid said...

I've got the first All-Star Squadron Special, I think, but I don't remember ever reading any other issues, TC, so I'm not sure what Buckler's art on the title looked like. (If he illustrated the Special, I haven't read it in years, so I don't recall it.) I never really took to the revival of those '30s & 40s heroes. In fact, I found the concept of 'two-worlds' off-putting.

Phil S said...

Another sad loss. It's sort of inevitable as the Bronze Age of comics creators get older. I really enjoyed his Deathlok series and should get the collection.

Kid said...

It's well-worth having, PS. I got it and read it a few months back and am glad to have it in my collection.

spirit of '64 said...

A sad loss.
Buckler was one of Marvel's top super-hero artists from 73 for a couple of years, taking over from Big John on the FF and Thor when Buscema decided he wanted to get away from super-heroes and dedicate more of his time to Conan. Some of his features are mentioned above but Buckler was also the artist that revived the Black Panther in Jungle Action and did at least one impressive issue of Morbius, and a fill in on Conan.
Buckler was enticed over to the post-infantino DC but did not make the same impact. I think he did the Superman vs. Wonder Woman tabloid but seemed to lack any continuing top feature. There was some controversy about an issue of Star Hunters he did, and unfortunately a lot of the mud thrown then seemed to have stuck.
Buckler returned to Marvel several times, and drew some of Englehart's later FF issues, but it was insipid stuff compared to his '70s work.
Buckler was at his best when inspired by Adams, was at ease imitating Buscema but was more well known for imitating Kirby. He was a 'go to' cover man for both DC and Marvel.
I remember his Avengers (particularly 102) and his FF (particularly from 154 on) with fondness.

Kid said...

He still had a lot of work left in him, and, at some stage, he believed he would make a full recovery from his illness, but, alas, 'twas not to be. Too many great artists dying recently, but, cliched as it sounds, his name will live on through his work for many a year - maybe forever.

spirit of '64 said...

Rich did the Superman vs.Shazam tabloid....not the Wonder Woman one. Apologies for the mistake ( I have neither, but may now seek our the Supes vs Shazam tabloid, and the Galaxia magazine, where Rich continued his Demon Hunter feature)

Kid said...

That tabloid is reprinted in the Superman/Shazam softcover collected edition, '64. Worth having.

Graham said...

I first saw Rich Buckler's art in Fantastic Four, but man, he drew just about everything else during my tenure reading comics for just about every company. I know some people didn't like his "swiping," but I thought it was pretty neat that he was capable of doing it so well. I enjoyed his tenure with All Star Squadron.....he and Jerry Ordway worked pretty well together and his brief tenure with Justice League of America, too. Sadly, I missed out on his Black Panther and Deathlok series.....they were a little bit before my time with Marvel. He was one of those go-to artist for me.....If I saw his name in the credits, I usually bought it.

Kid said...

I've got the softcover collections of Panther and Deathlok, G, and they're pretty good. If you're still into comics, you should consider catching up on what you missed when you were younger. (No, I don't get a percentage.) I think he must've drawn just about every major hero for Marvel and DC at some point in his career, and he always did a decent job.

Philip Crawley said...

And there goes another one. Rich will forever be associated with Deathlok in my mind and an indelible part of my 70s comics reading recollections. Had all of the original Deathlok comics back in the day,parted company with some over the years but the collected edition brings them all back together. Liked his work on just about everything I saw his name attached to. The whole swipe thing was never an issue with me - I just liked the art no matter what elements may have been 'homages' to others.

Kid said...

That's pretty much how I feel, PC, although I never had every Deathlok issue at the time - probably no more than a handful at most. I've got them all now 'though, in the collected edition. He was only 68, which is really no age at all.

Marcus said...

I know I'm late with this, as I'm catching up here but Rich Buckler's passing hits me hard. My comics partner and spent an evening in his studio in NYC with Rich, his son, and his assistants. He mentored many young artists. He drew the cover to Fantastic Worlds #2, a indie in '95, of my characters Captain Courage and Johnny Halo. In his Kirby style! I'll never forget that. He was very gracious and free with advice. He will be sorely missed.

Kid said...

At least you have the memory of meeting him and having him illustrate your characters, M. That must have been a thrill for you. Cliched as it may sound, he'll live on through his work.

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