Wednesday, 2 September 2015

ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN IN THE NEXT FOUR PAGES...



From the pages of the TV CENTURY 21 SUMMER EXTRA for
1966, comes this four page STINGRAY tale.  You know what 'though?  I
first saw Stingray in black and white (didn't get a colour TV until sometime
in the '70s), but because of the colour strip in the weekly TV21 (and much
later colour screenings), it now seems like I saw it that way back in the '60s.
False memory syndrome?  However, the point I'm making is that because
of that, seeing Stingray in a b&w strip somehow seems odd to me.  Any-
way, that's enough self-indulgent twaddle from me - I'll now let you
get into the action.  After all, it's what you're here for!



4 comments:

John Pitt said...

And that's the same for me to. In fact, I have NEVER watched a full episode in colour, but I remember it all in glorious Supermarionation colour, and all because of our beloved, sacred TV 21!
I feel so sorry for the youngsters who never lived through its heyday!
First time read for me for this strip Kidda, as I didn't get any of the specials.

Kid said...

I think I originally only bought the first two Specials, JP - I can't even remember seeing the other four. In fact, maybe I only ever got the first one. (By that I mean I definitely bought the first one, but it may have been the only one I got.) I now own all six of them and just love browsing through them.

TC said...

We didn't get a color TV until the mid-1970's, so I would have watched the marionette shows and UFO in B&W. I think we had a color set by the time Space:1999 premiered, but I'm not 100% certain.

Thunderbirds was rerun in the US in the 1990's. It was in color, of course, but I don't know if it was originally filmed that way. I seen to remember reading a TV Guide article or something saying that the reruns were computer colorized, but I also seem to remember reading somewhere that it was the first Gerry Anderson show to be filmed in color.

Kid said...

Stingray was the first Gerry Anderson show to be filmed in colour, TC. Most TVs in Britain then were b&w, so the colour was obviously aimed at the American market. Thunderbirds was shot in colour, but the first few were only half an hour long, until Lew Grade asked GA to lengthen them to fill an hour time slot (allowing for ads). I wish they'd computer colour Supercar and Fireball Xl5. (One episode of XL5 was coloured as an extra on the boxed set.)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...