Monday, 4 February 2013

PART TWO OF T.H.U.N.D.E.R. AGENTS COVER GALLERY...



The above cover is one of my favourite WALLY WOOD drawings
ever, mainly because it reminds me of four different houses. I first saw it 
and read the contents) back in the '60s while we were visiting friends who
lived across the street from where we'd once lived some years before. So
not only does it conjure up memories of two houses in my old neighbour-
hood, but also the house in which I was living at the time. I also associate
it with my present abode because I bought an ALAN CLASS comic
in the '70s which bore the exact same cover illustration.

However, ignore my personal reminiscences - no doubt you have
memories of your own which spring to mind when you look at the
accompanying collection of covers which lies before you. So, go
on, indulge yourself - you have my complete permission.




5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I tend to associate T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents #7, Undersea Agent #4, and, later, Noman #1 with my late grandparents' house, since I first read those comics during visits there. I must have been in third grade or so at the time, and it seems like it was during spring break and/or summer vacation (although my memory could be playing tricks with dates). There are several Silver Age comics I associate with those visits, mostly DC, some Gold Key, a few Marvel.

Anonymous said...

Agent "Kitten" Kane wasn't much help on the cover of #6, was she? She wasn't even warning them of the danger, since the villain had already clobbered the heroes. Maybe one should judge it in the context of the time, though. Back then, there were few really competent heroines in action-adventure fiction (the notable exceptions included Wonder Woman and Emma Peel). Even super-heroines like Sue Storm and the Scarlet Witch seemed to be helpless victims much of the time, constantly getting kidnapped or taken hostage. At least Kitten was actively taking part in the shoot-out on the cover of #11.

Kid said...

I think in most cases, women were regarded mainly as 'cover candy', which is why they were often portrayed in typical helpless female type stances. Whenever I think of Kirby Fantastic Four covers, it seems that Sue was always in the background looking anxious.

Anonymous said...

Most of those Tower comics remind me of long family holiday weekends in Blackpool as a kid, not the originals ()I never bought/saw an original Tower comic) but as noted the Alan Class reprints (especially Thunder Agents 3,4,5,6 and Dynamo 1 and 2 which I still have although I doubt they were complete reprints of the original comics)they used to have thee comics (and US Marvels a few DC Warrens Seaboards etc) piled up outside shops by the hundred in some cases - saying that I picked up a few others Alan Class "Thunder" comics in Rutherglen (near Glasgow) where I lived at the time - some great artists and nice stories in those books Wood ws a great artist (and even better cartoonist imho) McScotty

Kid said...

Unfortunately, by the time I started buying Alan Class titles in the mid-'70s, the plates were so worn that the printing wasn't always of the highest quality. The results were even worse in the '80s 'though. Probably the ones from the '60s will have much sharper and blacker reproduction.